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Archive for May 2015

Large-Scale Detection and Tracking of Aircraft from Satellite Images

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Abstract
In this paper a distributed system for detecting and tracking commercial aircraft from medium resolution synthetic satellite images is presented. Discussion consisting of the system’s Apache Spark distributed architecture, correlation-based template matching, heuristic-based tracking, and evaluation of the system’s Standalone, Cluster, and Cloud modes of operation are covered before concluding with future work. Experimental results support 10 m detection accuracy, 96% detection rate, and 200 ms/image and 10 mb/sec Cloud processing performance. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that a satellite-based aircraft tracking system is feasible and that the system’s oversimplifying assumptions offer a baseline which similar real-world systems may be compared. Applications of this system include real-time tracking of commercial aircraft, flight deviation, and the automatic discovery of commercial aircraft from historic imagery. To the best of the author’s knowledge, a system of this nature has not been published publicly.

Introduction

Motivation

Historically, search and rescue operations have relied on on-site volunteers to expedite the recovery of missing aircraft. However, on-site volunteers are not always an option when the search area is very broad, or difficult to access or traverse as was the case when Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared over the Indian Ocean in March, 2014. Crowd-sourcing services such as tomnod.com have stepped up to the challenge by offering volunteers to manually inspect satellite images for missing aircraft in an attempt to expedite the recovery process. This process is effective, but slow. Given the urgency of these events, an automated image processing solution is needed.

Prior Work

The idea of detecting and tracking objects from satellite images is not new. There is plenty of academic literature on detection or tracking, but often not both for things like oil tankers, aircraft, and even clouds. Most distributed image processing literature is focused on using grid, cloud, or specialized hardware for processing large streams of image data using specialized software or general platforms like Hadoop. Commercially, companies like DigitalGlobe have lots of satellite data, but haven’t publicized their processing frameworks. Start-ups like Planet Labs have computing and satellite resources capable of processing and providing whole earth coverage, but have not publicized any work on this problem.

The FAA has mandated a more down to earth approach through ADS-B. By 2020, all aircraft flying above 10,000 ft will be required to have Automatic dependent surveillance broadcast transceivers in order to broadcast their location, bearing, speed and identifying information so that they can be easily tracked. Adoption of the standard is increasing with sites like Flightrader24.com and Flightaware.org providing real-time access to ongoing flights.

Problem Statement

Fundamentally, there are two variants of this problem: online and offline. The offline variant most closely resembles the tomnod.com paradigm which is concerned with processing historic satellite images. The online variant most closely resembles air traffic control systems where we’d be processing a continual stream of images coming from a satellite constellation providing whole earth coverage. The focus of this work is on the online variant since it presents a series of more interesting problems (of which the offline problem can be seen as a sub-problem.)

In both cases, we’d need to be able to process large volumes of satellite images. One complication is that large volumes of satellite images are difficult and expensive to come by. To work around this limitation, synthetic images will be generated based off OpenFlights.org data with the intent of evaluating natural images on the system in the future. To generate data we’ll pretend there are enough satellites in orbit to provide whole earth coverage capturing simulated flights over a fixed region of space and window of time. The following video is an example of the approximately 60,000 flights in the dataset being simulated to completion:

To detect all these aircraft from a world-wide image, we’ll use correlation based template matching. There are many ways to parallelize and distribute this operation, but an intuitive distributed processing of image patches will be done with each cluster node performing a parallelized Fast Fourier Transform to identify any aircraft in a given patch. Tracking will be done using an online heuristic algorithm to “connect the dots” recovered from detection. At the end of the simulation, these trails of dots will be paired with simulated routes to evaluate how well the system did.

The remainder of this post will cover the architecture of the system based on Apache Spark, its configurations for running locally and on Amazon Web Services, and how well it performs before concluding with possible future work and cost analysis of what it would take to turn this into a real-world system.

System Architecture

Overview

pipeline
Figure 1: Data pipeline architecture.

The system relies on the data pipeline architecture presented above. Data is read in from the OpenFlights.org dataset consisting of airport information and flight routes. A fixed number of national flights are selected and passed along to a simulation module. At each time step, the simulator identifies which airplanes to launch, update latitude and longitude coordinates, and remove those that have arrived at their destination.

To minimize the amount of network traffic being exchanged between nodes, flights are placed into buckets based on their current latitude and longitude. Buckets having flights are then processed in parallel by the Spark Workers. Each worker receives a bucket and generates a synthetic satellite image; this image is then given to the detection module which in turn recovers the coordinates from the image.

These coordinates are coalesced at the Spark Driver and passed along to the tracking module where the coordinates are appended to previously grown flight trails. Once 24 hours worth of simulated time has elapsed (in simulated 15 minute increments), the resulting tracking information is passed along to a reporting module which matches the simulated routes with the flight trails. These results are then visually inspected for quality.

Simulation Assumptions

All latitude and longitude calculations are done under the Equirectangular projection. A corresponding flight exists for each route in the OpenFlights.org dataset (Open Database License). Flights departing hourly follow a straight line trajectory between destinations. Once en route, flights are assumed to be Boeing 747s traveling at altitude of 35,000 ft with a cruising speed of 575 mph.

Generation

grids
Figure 2: Conceptual layering and data representations between the modules of the pipeline. World silhouette by Wikimedia Commons.

Flights are mapped to one of 4000 \times 8000 buckets based on each flight’s latitude and longitude coordinate. Each bucket spans a 0.045 \times 0.045 degree region as illustrated in the middle layer of Fig. (2). Given a bucket, a 512 \times 512 oversimplified synthetic medium-resolution monochromatic satellite image is created with adorning aircraft silhouettes for each 71 \times 65 m Boeing 747 airliner in the bucket. (Visual obstructions such as clouds or nightfall will not be depicted.) This image, in addition to the latitude and longitude of the top-left and bottom-right of the image, are then passed along to the detection module.

Detection

Given an image and its world coordinate frame, the detection module performs textbook Fourier-based correlation template matching to identify silhouettes of airplanes, X, in the image, Y:

\displaystyle Z = \mathcal{F}^{-} \left( \mathcal{F}(X) \circ \mathcal{F}(Y) \right ) (1)

Where the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and inverse transform are defined as:

\displaystyle \mathcal{F}(f)(u,v) = \frac{1}{M N} \sum_{m = 0}^{M - 1} \sum_{n = 0}^{N - 1} f(m, n) \exp{ \left( -2 \pi i \left( \frac{mu}{M} + \frac{nv}{N} \right ) \right ) } (2)

\displaystyle \mathcal{F^{-}}(F)(m,n) = \sum_{u = 0}^{M - 1} \sum_{v = 0}^{N - 1} F(u, v) \exp{ \left( 2 \pi i \left( \frac{mu}{M} + \frac{nv}{N} \right ) \right ) } (3)

To carry out these calculations efficiently, a parallelized two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) \mathcal{O}(N \log N) time algorithm was implemented for both forward and inverse operations by leveraging the fact that operations (2), (3) can be factored so that the FFT can be computed row-wise, and then on those results column-wise. Hadamard (element-wise) product of the frequency domain representation of the airplane and satellite image is done naively in quadratic time.

To denoise the results, the recovered spatial product, Z, is thresholded so that any real values greater than 90% of the product’s real maximum, Z^*, are kept:

\displaystyle Z_{x,y} = \Re{ \left( Z_{x, y} \right ) } 1_{ [ \Re{ \left( Z_{x, y} \right ) } \ge 0.9 Z^{*}  ] } (4)

Since there are many values greater than the threshold, a linear time (in number of nodes) connected component labeling algorithm is applied to identify the most likely aircraft locations. The algorithm treats each pixel of the image as a node if that pixel’s value is greater than the threshold. An edge exists between two nodes if the nodes’ pixel coordinates are within an \ell_\infty distance of two. The centroid of each connected component is then taken to be the true coordinate of each detected aircraft. Next only those centroids derived from clusters having more than half the average number of pixels per cluster are kept. Finally, these centroids are transformed to latitude and longitude coordinates given the world coordinate frame.

Tracking

The tracking module uses an 181 \times 361 grid of buckets with each bucket representing approximately a square degree region as illustrated as the top layer in Fig. (2). Each individual bucket consists of a stack of sightings where a sighting is a timestamped collection of coordinates. Here an individual coordinate is allowed to “connect” up to two other coordinates. Coordinates connected in this fashion form a trail, which is the primary output of the module.

tracking-heuristics
Figure 3: (Left) Collinear and (Right) directional tracking heuristics. Blue points C represent coordinates that would be accepted under these heuristics and red points C^\prime that would be rejected.

For each latitude and longitude coordinate from the detection module, d \in D, the tracking module picks all the previous time step’s coordinates, p \in P, from the neighboring (\ell_\infty \le 5) buckets of d‘s bucket. From P, only those coordinates that satisfy the following criteria are considered:

  • p must be free to “connect” to another coordinate.
  • d must be collinear to the coordinates of the trail headed by p, i.e., \lvert AC - AB - BC \rvert \le \epsilon as in Fig. (3).
  • Given the predecessor of p, the inner product of the vectors formed from the predecessor to p and d must be positive, i.e., \langle \overrightarrow{AB}, \overrightarrow{AC} \rangle > 0 as in Fig. (3).

Next, the nearest neighbor of p is chosen from this remaining set of points. If a nearest neighbor exists, then p is appended to the end of the nearest neighbor’s trail, otherwise a new trail is created. Finally, p is added to its designated bucket so that it can be used for future trail building.

When the simulation completes, all trails from tracking module are analyzed and matched to the known routes used in the simulation. Matching is done by minimizing the distance from the trail’s origin and destination to a route’s origin and destination respectively. If the mean orthogonal distance:

\displaystyle MOD(x) = \frac{1}{N} \sum_{i} \frac{ \lvert \langle w, x_i \rangle + b \rvert  }{ \lVert w \rVert  } (5)

from the coordinates in the trail to the line formed by connecting the route’s origin and destination is greater than 25 m, then the match is rejected.

Reporting

The reporting module is responsible for summarizing the system’s performance. The average mean orthogonal distance given by Eqn. (5) is reported for all identified routes, total number of images processed and coordinates detected, and the portion of routes correctly matched is reported.

System Configurations

Standalone

standalone
Figure 4: Standalone configuration components.

Standalone mode runs the application in a single JVM without using Spark. Experiments were ran on the quad-core Intel i7 3630QM laptop jaws, which has 8 GB of memory, 500 GB hard drive, and is running Windows 8.1 with Java SE 7.

Cluster

cluster
Figure 5: Cluster configuration components.

Cluster mode runs the application on a Spark cluster in standalone mode. Experiments were ran on a network consisting of two laptop computers connected to a private 802.11n wireless network. In addition to jaws, the laptop oddjob was used. oddjob is a quad-core Intel i7 2630QM laptop with 6 GB of memory, 500 GB hard drive running Windows 7. Atop each machine, Oracle VM VirtualBox hosts two cloned Ubuntu 14.04 guest operating systems. Each virtual machine has two cores, 2 GB of memory and a 8 GB hard drive. Each virtual machine connects to the network using a bridged network adapter to its host’s. Host and guest operating systems are running Java SE 7, Apache Hadoop 2.6, and Scala 2.11.6 as prerequisites for Apache Spark 1.3.1. In total, there are four Spark Workers who report to a single Spark Master which is driven by a single Spark Driver.

Cloud

cloud
Figure 6: Cloud configuration components.

Cloud mode runs the application on an Amazon Web Services (AWS) provisioned Spark cluster managed by Apache Yarn. Experiments were ran using AWS’s Elastic Map Reduce (EMR) platform to provision the maximum allowable twenty[1] Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) previous generation m1.medium instances (one master, nineteen core) by scheduling jobs to execute the application JARs from the Simple Storage Service (S3). Each m1.medium instance consists of one 2 GHz CPU, 3.7 GB of memory, 3.9 GB hard drive running Amazon Machine Image (AMI) 3.6 equipped with Red Hat 4.8, Java SE 7, Spark 1.3.0. In total, there are nineteen Spark Workers and one Spark Master – one per virtual machine – managed by a Yarn Resource Manager driven by a single Yarn Client hosting the application.

System Evaluation

Detection Rate

detection-rate
Figure 7: \overline{D}_r reported for flights in a single 25 km2 region. Larger \overline{D}_ris better.

\displaystyle D_R = \frac{\# \left( \text{Detected coordinates} \right)}{\# \left( \text{Expected coordinates} \right)} (6)

When an image is sparsely populated, the system consistently detects the presence of the aircraft, however as the density increases, the system is less adapt at finding all flights in the region as shown in Fig. (7). This is unexpected behavior. Explanations include the possibility that the threshold needs to be made to be adaptive, or that a different approach needs to be taken all together. In terms of real world implications, FAA regulations (JO 7110.65V 5-4-4) state that flights must maintain a minimum lateral distance of 3 and 5 miles (4.8 to 8 km). In principle, there could be at most four flights in a given image under these guidelines and the system would still have a 96.6% chance of identifying all four positions.

Detection Accuracy

den-ctl
Figure 8: Detected and actual positions of a fight from Denver to Charlotte.

A flight from DIA to CTL was simulated to measure how accurate the template matching approach works as illustrated in Fig. (8). Two errors were measured: the mean orthogonal distance given by Eqn. (5) and the mean distance between the detected and actual coordinate for all time steps:

\displaystyle MD(x, y) = \frac{1}{N} \sum_i \lVert  x_i - y_i \rVert_2 (7)

For Eqn. (5) a mean error of 9.99 \pm 3.2 m was found, and for Eqn. (7) 19.95 \pm 3.3 m. Both errors are acceptable given a single pixel represents approximately 10 m. (For context, the global positioning system (GPS) has a 7.8 m error.)

mod-dist
Figure 9: 65% of the paired trails and routes have a MOD less than 26 m. Smaller error is better.

In terms of how accurate detection is at the macro level, 500 flights were simulated and the resulting mean orthogonal distance was analyzed. Fig. (9) illustrates the bimodal distribution that was observed. 65% of the flights observed an accuracy less than 26 m with an average accuracy of 14.2 \pm 5.8 m, while the remaining 35% saw an average accuracy of 111.9 \pm 100 km which is effectively being off by a full degree. It is assumed that this 35% are cases where trails are paired incorrectly with routes. Based on these findings, the system enforces that all pairings not exceed a mean orthogonal distance of 25 m.

Tracking Rate

tracking-rate
Figure 10: 2^n for n \in [0, 10] national fights were simulated to completion with their mean tracking rate reported over 15 trials. Larger \overline{T}_R is better.

\displaystyle T_R = \frac{\# \left( \text{Correctly paired trails} \right)}{\# \left(\text{ Expected trails} \right)} (8)

For Fig. (10), an increasing number of random flights were simulated to completion and the resulting mean tracking rate reported. Based on these findings, the tracking module is having difficulty correctly handling many concurrent flights originating from different airports. This behavior is likely a byproduct of how quickly the detection rate degrades when many flights occupy a single region of space. When running a similar simulation where all flights originate from the same airport, the tracking rate is consistently near-perfect independent of the number of flights. This would suggest the system has difficulty with flights that cross paths. (For context, there is on average 7,000 concurrent flights over US airspace at any given time that we would wish to track.)

Performance

performance
Figure 11: Average processing time per image in milliseconds for the three dierent congurations. Smaller ms/image is better.

A series of experiments was conducted against the three configurations to measure how quickly the system could process different volumes of flights across the United States over a 24-hours period. The results are illustrated in Fig. (11). Unsurprisingly, the Cloud mode outperforms both the Standalone and Cluster modes by a considerable factor as the number of flights increases.

Configuration ms/image mb/sec Time (min)
Standalone 704 3.00 260
Cluster 670 2.84 222
Cloud 207 9.67 76
Table 1: Processing time per image, megabytes of image data processed per second, and overall processing time for 22k images by system configuration.

Table (1) lists the overall processing time for 22k images representing roughly 550k km2, and 43 GB of image data. If the Cloud configuration was used to monitor the entire United States, then it would need approximately 22 hours to process a single snapshot consisting of 770 GB of image data. Obviously, the processing time is inadequate to keep up with a recurring avalanche of data every fifteen minutes. To do so, a real-world system would need to be capable of processing an image every 2 ms. To achieve this 1) more instances could be added, 2) the implementation can be refined to be more efficient, 3) the implementation can leverage GPUs for detection, and 4) a custom tailored alternative to Spark could be used.

Discussion

Future Work

There are many opportunities to exchange the underlying modules with more robust techniques that both scale and are able to handle real-world satellite images. The intake and generation modules can be adapted to either generate more realistic flight paths and resulting satellite imagery, or adapted to handle real-world satellite imagery from a vendor such as Skybox Imaging, Planet Labs, or DigitalGlobe.

For detection, the correlation based approach can be replaced with a cross-correlation approach, or with the more involved Scale Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) method which would be more robust at handling aircraft of different sizes and orientations. Alternatively, the parallelism granularity can be changed so that the two-dimensional FFT row-wise and column-wise operations are distributed over the cluster permitting the processing of larger images.

Tracking remains an open issue for this system. Getting the detection rate to be near perfect will go a long way, but the age of historical sightings considered could be increased to account for “gaps” in the detection trail. Yilmaz et al. provide an exhaustive survey of deterministic and statistical point tracking methods that can be applied here, in particular the Joint Probability Data Association Filter (JPDAF) and Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (MHT) methods which are worth exploring further.

On the reporting end of the system, a dashboard showing all of the detected trails and coordinates would provide an accessible user interface to end-users to view and analyze flight trails, discover last known locations, and detect anomalies.

Real-world Feasibility

While the scope of this work has focused on system internals, it is important to recognize that a real-world system requires a supporting infrastructure of satellites, ground stations, computing resources, facilities and staff- each of which imposes its own set of limitations on the system. To evaluate the system’s feasibility, its expected cost is compared to the expected cost of the ADS-B approach.

Following the CubeSat model and a 1970 study by J. G. Walker, 25 satellites ($1M ea.) forming a constellation in low earth orbit is needed to provide continuous whole earth coverage for $25M. Ground stations ($120k ea.) can communicate with a satellite at a time bringing total costs to $50M.[2] Assuming that a single computer is responsible for square degree region, the system will require 64,800 virtual machines, equivalently 1,440 quad-core servers ($1k ea.) bringing the running total to $51M.

ADS-B costs are handled by aircraft owners. Average upgrade costs are $5k with prices varying by vendor and aircraft. Airports already have Universal Access Transceivers (UATs) to receive the ADS-B signals. FAA statistics list approximately 200,000 registered aircraft suggesting total cost of $1B.

Given that these are very rough estimates, an unobtrusive $51M system would be a good alternative to a $1B dollar exchange between private owners to ADS-B vendors. (Operational costs of the system were estimated to be $1.7M/year based on market rates for co-locations and staff salaries.)

Conclusions

In this work, a distributed system has been presented to detect and track commercial aircraft from synthetic satellite imagery. The system’s accuracy and detection rates are acceptable given established technologies. Given suitable hardware resources, it would be an effective tool in assisting search-and-rescue teams locate airplanes from historic satellite images. More work needs to be done to improve the system’s tracking abilities for it to be a viable real-world air traffic control system. While not implemented, the data needed to support flight deviation, flight collision detection and other air traffic control functionality is readily available. Spark is an effective tool for quickly distributing work to a cluster, but more specialized high performance computing approaches may yield better runtime performance.

References

[1] Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ads-b) out equipment and use. Technical Report 14 CFR 91.225, U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration, May 2010.

[2] General aviation and air taxi activity survey. Technical Report Table 1.2, U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration, Sep 2014.

[3] Nanosats are go! The Economist, June 7 2014.

[4] A. Eisenberg. Microsatellites: What big eyes they have. New York Times, August 10 2013.

[5] A. Fasih. Machine vision. Lecture given at Transportation Informatics Group, ALPEN-ADRIA University of Klagenfurt, 2009.

[6] S. Kang, K. Kim, and K. Lee. Tablet application for satellite image processing on cloud computing platform In Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2013 IEEE International, pages 1710-1712, July 2013.

[7] W. Lee, Y. Choi, K. Shon, and J. Kim. Fast distributed and parallel pre-processing on massive satellite data using grid computing. Journal of Central South University, 21(10):3850-3855, 2014.

[8] J. Lewis. Fast normalized cross-correlation. In Vision interface, volume 10, pages 120-123, 1995.

[9] W. Li, S. Xiang, H. Wang, and C. Pan. Robust airplane detection in satellite images. In Image Processing (ICIP), 2011 18th IEEE International conference on, pages 2821-2824, Sept 2011.

[10] D. G. Lowe. Distinctive image features from scale-invariant keypoints. International journal of computer vision, 60(2):91-110, 2004.

[11] H. Prajapati and S. Vij. Analytical study of parallel and distributed image processing. In Image Information Processing (ICIIP), 2011 International Conference on, pages 1-6, Nov 2011.

[12] E. L. Ray. Air traffic organization policy. Technical Report Order JO 7110.65V, U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration, April 2014.

[13] J. Tunaley. Algorithms for ship detection and tracking using satellite imagery. In Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2004. IGARSS ’04. Proceedings. 2004 IEEE International, volume 3, pages 1804-1807, Sept 2004.

[14] J. G. Walker. Circular orbit patterns providing continuous whole earth coverage. Technical report, DTIC Document, 1970.

[15] Y. Yan and L. Huang. Large-scale image processing research cloud. In CLOUD COMPUTING 2014, The Fifth International Conference on Cloud Computing, GRIDs, and Virtualization, pages 88-93, 2014.

[16] A. Yilmaz, O. Javed, and M. Shah. Object tracking: A survey. Acm computing surveys (CSUR), 38(4):13, 2006.

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